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Resistance learning centre

There’s a lot to know when it comes to resistance. That’s why we’ve created this section: so you have the most information possible – and give you what you need to take action today.

Tools and Downloads

Look for a pattern by plotting your Groups below. Or identify what weeds are on your farm with the Weed Identification tool. 

Here’s an overview of the complete herbicide market in Canada. This chart can help you see the total number of herbicide products, targeted weeds and the overall acre distribution, all by herbicide Group.

  • Group 1

    Acres of Distribution 30.8 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 20

    Most resistant weeds Wild Oats Green Foxtail

  • Group 2

    Acres of Distribution 39.1 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 31

    Most resistant weeds Wild Oats Kochia

  • Group 3

    Acres of Distribution 1.0 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 3

    Most resistant weeds Green Foxtail Stinkweed

  • Group 4

    Acres of Distribution 43.8 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 33

    Most resistant weeds Pigweed Hemp-nettle

  • Group 5

    Acres of Distribution 294 Thousand

    Number of herbicide brands 1

    Most resistant weeds None in Western Canada

  • Group 6

    Acres of Distribution 13.2 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 11

    Most resistant weeds None in Western Canada

  • Group 8

    Acres of Distribution 68 Thousand

    Number of herbicide brands 3

    Most resistant weeds Wild Oats

  • Group 9

    Acres of Distribution 78.1 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 14

    Most resistant weeds Kochia

  • Group 10

    Acres of Distribution 11.8 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 1

    Most resistant weeds None in Western Canada

  • Group 14

    Acres of Distribution 5.6 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 3

    Most resistant weeds None in Western Canada

  • Group 27

    Acres of Distribution 5.2 Million

    Number of herbicide brands 4

    Most resistant weeds None in Western Canada

  • WILD OAT

    AVENA FATUA
    Wild

    Widespread in summer wheat production, wild oat has a very high growth rate and greatly reduces yield. Because it’s comparable to wheat, it is very competitive; only 5 plants per hectare are tolerated on wheat seed propagation fields. It can grow in most soils (heavy, light, acid, alkaline) but is particularly troublesome in cereals on heavy land.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Young plant: youngest leaf is rolled, leaf blades coloured dark green, up to 40 cm long and 4 to 18 mm wide.
    · Leaves: membranous ligule up to 6 mm long, often irregularly toothed; no auricles; sheaths smooth or slightly hairy, especially in younger plants.
    · Flowers: loose, open panicle with 2- or 3-flowered pedicelled spikelets; lemmas end in 2 small teeth, 2 to 3 awns rising from back, mostly dark-colored, bent and 3 to 4 cm long.
    · Stems: erect, from 40 to 150 cm high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 1 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Varro™ (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 1 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Puma Advance (Group 1), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10), Centurion (Group 1)
    · Group 8 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Puma Advance (Group 1), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Varro (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 8 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 1, 2, 8 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • BALL MUSTARD

    NESLIA PANICULATA
    Ball

    An annual or winter annual reproducing by seeds only. Ball mustard leaves alternate, entirely or occasionally, with a few blunt teeth, sparsely covered with starry hairs. Lower leaves are somewhat stalked and lanceolate, while upper leaves are arrow-shaped and clasping the stem. Its small flowers are yellow to orange-yellow and about three mm across, clustered at the ends of stems. The stem is erect, anywhere from 30 to 60 cm high, branched above, small, star-shaped hairs especially on lower portion.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper® (Group 4, 6)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • GREEN FOXTAIL

    SETARIA VIRIDIS
    Green

    While individual plants cause only moderate yield reduction, the risk with green foxtail is that it often occurs in high densities. It can escape control by late emergence after herbicides have typically been applied.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: oblong with hairy margins.
    · Leaves: wide, flat, acuminate, light green (sometimes reddish-purple), drooping, distinctly but finely veined with prominent mid-vein below (keeled), mid-vein white or light green, scabrous above, usually glabrous below.
    · Flowers: dense spike-like panicle inflorescence, erect or slightly nodding at the tip, rachis often pilose; spikelets in very short panicle branches, each spikelet elliptical, subtended by 1 to 3 bristles 5 to 10 mm long, usually green, rarely purple.
    · Stems: more-or-less erect, thin and hairless up to 70 cm, rarely 100 cm high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 1 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Varro™ (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 1 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Puma Advance (Group 1), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Centurion (Group 1)
    · Group 3 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Varro (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27), Puma Advance (Group 1), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27)
    · Group 3 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Centurion (Group 1)
    · Group 1, 3 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Varro (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 1, 3 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • CHICKWEED

    STELLARIA MEDIA
    Chickweed

    Competing mainly for water and nutrients, chickweed is an annual or perennial prostrate weed that can germinate in fall or spring. The fall-germinating plants can make seeds by the following spring; they can form thick mats in winter cereals in mild weather conditions. It is typically found in good, well-tilled and moist soils.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: stemmed, lanceolate, smooth-edged, pale green, hairless, with a distinct midrib.
    · Leaves: opposite, in pairs, small, a pointed oval in shape, lower leaves stemmed, with a line of hairs on the stem.
    · Flowers: Round, prostrate and intertwining, generally with one row of hairs; plant can root from the nodes.
    · Stems: inconspicuous, small, star-shaped, in loose cymes; five white petals, deeply divided so that there appear to be 10 petals

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Thumper® (Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • WILD MUSTARD

    SINAPIS ARVENSIS
    Wild

    Wild mustard competes strongly for soil nutrients. It only reduces yield and interferes with combine harvesting in high densities and when no chemical weed control methods are applied. It prefers better, nutrient-rich or lime-rich soils.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Leaves: lower leaves petiolate, lobed, or sinuate-dentate, nearly lyre-formed; upper leaves ovate-oblong, only short-petiolate to sessile, irregularly dentate, usually undivided.
    · Flowers: numerous in dense, compounded clusters (corymb-like), as much as 30 cm long, gold-yellow.
    · Stems: erect, with ramified branches especially at top, roughly haired below, up to 60 cm high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 4 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Varro (Group 2), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 4 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 5 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 5 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • CLEAVERS

    GALIUM APARINE
    Cleavers

    Cleavers encourages lodging and can lead to a moderate-to-severe reduction in yield. It seriously interferes with harvesting and, because it increases grain moisture content, increases drying costs for cereals.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: elongated oval in shape, tough, fleshy, bluish-green, with a distinct notch at the tip.
    · Leaves: 4 to 8 lanceolate leaves forming whorls at the stem nodes; they are "sticky" due to downward-pointing bristles.
    · Flowers: many-flowered cymes in the leaf axils, which extend beyond the bract; flowers are small, white, inconspicuous.
    · Stems: prostrate or scrambling, square in cross-section, often branching, with "sticky" hairs at the ridges.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2, 4 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2, 4 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • SOW THISTLE

    SONCHUS OLERACEUS
    Spiny

    Leading to moderate yield reduction but relatively easy to control in corn and cereals, annual sow-thistle thrives in humus-rich, chalky, mild soils that are well supplied with nutrients

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Young plant: round, often flatly sinuate in front, light green.
    · Leaves: first leaves nearly circular, with fine teeth; following leaves runcinate-pinnatifid or undivided, soft, blue-green, enclosing the stalk sagittately, prickly dentate.
    · Flowers: heads (only labial flowers) light yellow to greenish yellow; capitulums and peduncles without glandular hairs.
    · Stems: erect, thick, ramified, up to 80 cm to 100 cm high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • WILD BUCKWHEAT

    POLYGONUM CONVOLVULUS 
    Wild

    One of the most common weeds in cereals and root crops. Owing to its winding growing habit, it seriously reduces yields and interferes with combine harvesting, and can sometimes grow en masse.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: long, narrow, bending downwards, with two halves unequal in size.
    · Leaves: ordate-sagittate, petiolate, juicy green, often reddish-tinged, pinnate-nerved, with ligule often incised; tips retracted downwards.
    · Flowers: small, inconspicuous, short-pedunculate, greenish, white-margined, in pairs or several in the axils.
    · Stems: thin, single or ramified, twisting, 20 to 100 cm long or high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper® (Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • KOCHIA

    KOCHIA SCOPARIA
    Kochia

    A noxious, invasive annual weed that reduces crop yield due to effective competition for light, nutrients and soil moisture, Kochia is highly adaptable and invades dry pastures, rangelands and cropland, ditch banks, wastelands and cultivated fields. It is very drought tolerant and can spread rapidly in these conditions.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Young plant: appears as a rosette, with narrow lance-shaped leaves.
    · Leaves: alternate, simple leaves are pubescent to nearly glabrous, 2.5 to 5 cm long, lanceolate to linear with hairy margins, and without petioles.
    · Flowers: small, greenish, inconspicuous at the end of branches.
    · Stems: erect, ramified, up to 30 to 150 cm high; main stem and branches covered with villous hairs.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 and Group 2, 9 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 and Group 2, 9 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • REDROOT PIGWEED

    AMARANTHUS RETROFLEXUS 
    Redroot

    This aggressive weed is native to tropical areas, but today is found throughout the US and is now growing in Canada. Pigweed greatly reduces yield and quality of crop, and interferes with combine harvesting. Because of its rapid growth and deep root system (longer than one metre), it competes fiercely for water and nutrition, and is very resistant to drought.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Leaves: long petiolate leaves, ovate, pointed, gray-green.
    · Flowers: borne in short, dense, sometimes branched spikes up to 20 cm long; green, each flower unisexual but with both male and female flowers on the same plant.
    · Stems: erect, single or branched, light green to reddish, fairly short and rough.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • HEMP-NETTLE

    GALEOPSIS TETRAHIT
    Hemp

    Hemp-nettle is an annual, seed-propagated weed that grows up to 40 cm (15.74 inches) tall. It moderately reduces yield and interferes with combine harvesting. To deal with it, the soil surface should be cultivated in spring and autumn. Regular hoeing in spring will destroy most seedlings. Delayed crop drilling allows time for pre-sowing cultivations to kill the first flush of seedlings.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Leaves: long oval in shape, with downy hairs on both sides, with large regular teeth and reddish-brown stem.
    · Flowers: pink-to-bluish-purple arising from the axils; dense whorls of flowers in the axils, pink-to-bluish-purple; upper lip helmet-like, middle lobe of lower lip almost square, with a yellow blotch, edged with purple, on lower lip.
    · Stems: square in cross-section, with swollen stem nodes; simple or branched, rough owing to their stiff hairs.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 4 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 6, 27), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Varro (Group 2), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)
    · Group 4 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • COW COCKLE

    SAPONARIA VACCARIA
    Cow

    An annual weed that reproduces by seed. Seeds germinate from late April to late May. Its leaves (anywhere from 2.5 to 8 cm long) are opposite and clasping, as well as being smooth and hairless. Flowers are pink and funnel-shaped, with five petals. The stems are erect and up to one metre tall, with swollen joints.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • LAMB’S QUARTERS

    CHENOPODIUM ALBUM 
    Lamb's

    An annual, monoecious weed, lamb’s quarters is typically found with row crops, causing yield reduction by nutritional deficiency, as well as competing strongly for light, water and nutrients. It also interferes with harvesting. It propagates itself by seed and occurs in many forms, up to 150 cm (59.05 inch) tall with a strong taproot.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Leaves: very variable, oval to triangular in shape, dark green, mostly with uneven, forward-pointing teeth; underside of leaves reddish-purple, upper surface has a mealy, silvery coating.
    · Flowers: Small, forming a pyramid-shaped inflorescence, inconspicuous and greenish in color, in closely packed clusters in the leaf axils; monoecious.
    · Stems: lower stem rounded or pentagonal in cross-section, mealy and silvery in appearance.
    · Cotyledons: fleshy, long and narrow with rounded tips, stemmed.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • NARROW-LEAVED HAWK’S BEARD

    CREPIS TECTORUM
    Narrow-leaved

    Looking somewhat similar to a dandelion, Narrow-leaved hawk’s beard grows anywhere from 20 to 60 cm tall. Its leaves change shape the higher up the stem they are – there is a rosette of basal leaves, each up to 15 cm (6 inches) long and 2.5 cm (1 inch) wide, coarsely toothed with a pointed tip and short leaf stem. Leaves on the lower part of the stem are more irregularly toothed or divided with sharply pointed lobes and curled. It grows a single yellow flower-like capitula 1.5 to 2 cm (0.6 to 0.8 in.) wide, surrounded by involucral bracts.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Infinity (Group 2,27), Tundra (Group 1,6,27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • PALE SMARTWEED

    POLYGONUM LAPATHIFOLIUM
    Pale

    A weed that’s common in cultivated fields, along roadsides and in other disturbed areas. Pale smartweed is very competitive, greatly reduces yield and interferes with combine harvesting. In order to control it, it’s necessary to use a combination of preventive, physical and chemical control methods – including varying the modes of action of herbicides that are used. Pale smartweed is an annual, many-formed, seed-propagated weed with a spindle-shaped root. Its hollow stem is swollen above the nodes, with sunken glands on the lower surface of the leaves, nodding spikes, and flattened seeds.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Leaves: elliptical-lanceolate, widest in the lowest third, markedly petiolate, upper surface often reddish-splotched, underside heavily glandularly dotted; membranous tube on the leaves' bases, loosely adjacent to the stalk; at the margin only short ciliate; first true leaf long, narrow and hairy, with a silvery appearance.
    · Flowers: small, greenish white to pale pink, in erect cylindrical, terminal or axillary inflorescences. Each flower cluster to 8 cm (3.15 inches) long, 3 to 9 mm (0.12 to 0.35 inch) thick, nodding.
    · Stems: erect or ascending, usually ramified, hairless, red spotted, up to 100 cm (39.37 inch) high.
    · Cotyledons: slender, length three times the width, with usually reddish hypocotyls.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • POWELL AMARANTH

    AMARANTHUS POWELLII
    Powell

    Powell amaranth is an annual, reproducing by seeds. Its leaves alternate on the stem, long-stalked, and range from dull green to shiny or reddish green. The leaf blade is oval- to diamond-shaped, but is usually broader at the base. The margins of the leaves are smooth. The tips of the leaves are pointed or sometimes slightly notched. The first leaves are tapered and pinched at the ends which is a distinguishing factor from redroot and smooth pigwee. Its flowers are small, green and crowded into coarse, bristly spikes at the top of the plant, with smaller spikes in the leaf axils below. They are longer and have a narrower terminal spike than redroot and smooth pigweed

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • RUSSIAN THISTLE

    SALSOLA SPP
    Russian

    An annual spiny weed that reproduces by seed. It has sharp-pointed alternating leaves, 2.5 to 5 cm long, that drop off at maturity. Its small flowers are either green or pink; they’re found in the leaf axils. The stem is branched and bushy, up to 1.0 m high, and often reddish striped.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • SHEPHERD’S-PURSE

    CAPSELLA BURSA-PASTORIS
    Shepard's

    Shepherd’s-purse is an annual or hardy-annual (facultative biennial), seed-propagated weed with many forms. Commonly found in many crops, shepherd’s-purse does not impact yield very much and does not interfere with combine harvesting – unless present in a large infestation, in which case its impact can be more severe. Mechanical weeding is a typical way of dealing with this weed.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: oblong-oval, very small, short-petiolate, prostrate.
    · Leaves: initially orbicular or spoon-shaped, first leaf usually entire; following leaves oblong, dentate or sinuately lobed to deeply incised, all petiolate; stalk leaves lanceolate, often undivided, sagittate sessile.
    · Flowers: small, white, in terminal, umbellately compacted inflorescence.
    · Stems: erect, simple or projectingly ramified, up to 50 cm (19.68 inch) high.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper®(Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

  • STINKWEED

    THLASPI ARVENSE 
    Stinkweed

    An annual or winter annual, stinkweed reproduces by seed. It gives off a distinctive unpleasant odour when its leaves are crushed. Stinkweed is a significant agricultural weed that competes with crops for moisture and space. It often emerges in high densities and causes large reductions in yield. Mechanical weed control methods in its early growth stages usually result in good control of this weed.

    WHAT TO LOOK FOR

    · Cotyledons: small, opposite, ovate
    · Leaves: lower leaves can be in the form of a rosette; in erect plants, leaves are alternate and without hairs; upper leaves clasp the stem.
    · Flowers: small, stalked, white petals.
    · Stems: smooth, erect, 5 to 60 cm (2 to 24 in.) high, and often branched.

    SOLUTIONS

    · Group 2 resistance – wheat solutions
    · Buctril® M (Group 4, 6), Infinity (Group 6, 27), Pardner® (Group 6), Thumper® (Group 4, 6), Tundra (Group 1, 6, 27), Velocity m3 (Group 2, 6, 27)
    · Group 2 resistance – canola solutions
    · Liberty in LibertyLink canola (Group 10)

Downloads

Herbicide
Herbicide Resistance Management Guide

An educational guide to help manage or delay the onset of herbicide resistance.

Download pdf icon

Growing
Weeds per Province
A weed resistance guide update for Western Canada.

Download pdf icon

Herbicide
Herbicide Resistance Summit II

Presentation deck from the 2nd National Summit on Strategies to Manage Herbicide-Resistant Weeds.

Download pdf icon

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